The Peter and Sally Family

 

 

Descendants of Daniel LeBlanc in Nova Scotia

{Peter's Father line of descent}

 

 

Birth and Marriage Certificates

 

 

Joseph Jenks the Colonist

{Peter's Mother line of descent}

 

Unproven Ancestors of Joseph Jenks

{Possible Clues}

 

 

James Smith of Weymouth MA

{Sally's line of descent}

 

John Howland of the Mayflower

{Sally has traced her father's line back to many passengers on the Mayflower.}

Mayflower passenger John Howland, married 

Mayflower passenger Elizabeth Tilley who also came on the Mayflower

Elizabeth came with her parents 

Mayflower passengers John Tilley and Joan Hurst

 

Antoine Dame from St, Martin Eveche' De cambrai France

{Sally's line of descent}

 

 

SAUGUS IRON WORKS

Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site is a National Historic Site located about 10 miles northeast of Downtown Boston in Saugus, Massachusetts. It is the site of the first integrated ironworks in North America, 1646 – 1668. It includes the reconstructed blast furnace, forge, rolling mill, and a restored 17th century house. It is also the location of the mill for which Joseph Jenks Sr. acquired the first machine patent in the American Colonies.

With the archaeological site of the 17th-century iron-making plant, the museum collection, the 17th-century Iron Works House, and the reconstructed iron works complex, Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site illustrates the critical role of iron making to 17th-century settlement and its legacy in shaping the early history of the nation. The site's enclave setting on the Saugus River, featuring an open-air museum with working water wheels, evokes a unique experience for park visitors. These resources demonstrate 17th-century engineering and design methods, iron-making technology and operations, local and overseas trade, and life and work in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Many of the Joseph Jenks artifacts discovered during excavation are on display at the restored Iron Works Museum.

The original manufacturing site served as a training ground for skilled iron workers for what would become America's iron and steel industry. Iron making provided the infrastructure for the rise of other colonial industries. Called, "the forerunner of America's industrial giants," the site served as a center for technology, innovation and invention. The site interprets early industrial manufacturing, with its enduring social, political and environmental ramifications.

The blast furnace, forge, rolling and slitting mill, warehouse, and dock area are all reconstructed on original sites and are based upon extensive archaeological excavations done between 1948 and 1953 by Roland W. Robbins. Hundreds of court records, inventories, and accounts of the original iron works were also consulted to produce a full-size (albeit, conjectural) model of the seventeenth century iron works. The "Iron Works House" is a timber framed, 1680s mansion house, still standing on its original location. It was constructed about a decade after the iron works ceased production.

Between 2005 and 2008 the historic site underwent significant renovations. The 1917 museum building (a chicken coop, turned, blacksmith shop, turned museum) underwent major restoration work and new exhibits were installed during the winter of 2006-2007. Most areas reopened in fall 2007 or spring 2008, however the park is closed seasonally from November to March.

From Wikipedia.

 

 

Photos from a recent Visit to the Saugus Iron Works

 


 

A special thanks to Dawn Newton [Quinn]

for much help in the research of the 

Schnopp Family     Dawn's line.

Butler Family, Peter's grandmother and Dawn's great-grandparents.

 

Family Photos

Brief Histories:

Dalton MA

Hinsdale MA

Documents & Histories

 

Links:

Berkshire County

Weather

RESEARCHED AND DEVELOPED

BY:

Peter H. White & Sally S. Smith [White]

IF YOU FIND ANY ADDITIONS OR DISCREPANCIES PLEASE CONTACT US.

Peter H. White (Peter@PeterandSally.com)

Sally S. Smith [White] (Sally@PeterandSally.com)

THIS IS A NEVER ENDING PROJECT.

 (AND WE MEAN THAT IN A GOOD WAY)

 CHECK BACK.